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Hi-Tide Resort One Million Visitors

By Wm. May
Published: 11/01/21 Topics: Fishing, HI Tide Resort, Ocean Shores WA Comments: 1

Photo credit: Dan Ayres/WDFW

For decades, tens of thousands of people have enjoyed staying at Hi-Tide Resort on Moclips Beach on the Coast of Washington State.

They come from everywhere around the Northwest, from across the United States, and even from foreign countries.

Visitors love the clean, crisp air, the natural dunes, the river that wraps around the property, and walking the beach for mile after mile.

Families return year after year, settling into their favorite condo where they can watch the sunset, cook on the resort grills, play horseshoes, jump in the surf, and even cast a line to catch perch and other delicacies.

Little do people know that millions of other visitors seem to find the destination just as intriguing. They are native to the area and seem to be flourishing because, well, they are frisky, shall we say.

If you have never eaten one, know this - Razor clams are an eating delicacy that grows only in certain places in the world, and they are especially prolific there.

Razors live in intertidal and subtidal zones and are filter feeders with short siphons, so they live just beneath the surface to feed, like right here, just below the surface of Moclips Beach.

When low tides expose the bottom, the clams dig and burrow deeper into the sand with their strong muscular feet.

The clams are plentiful because females have 6-10 million eggs, of which less than 5% will survive. When ocean temperature reaches 55+ degrees, the clams release their sperm and eggs into the water.

Larvae that develop from the eggs are free-floating and called "veligers," carried by the current.

Over the course of 5-16 weeks (depending on water temperature), they develop a shell and settle to the seafloor as juveniles, but of those, 95% die of natural causes.

Razor Clams that survive burrow deeper and become harvestable when they reach 3.5 inches in one year and 4.5 inches in two. They can then begin to reproduce.

Dan Ayres, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife coastal shellfish manager, says reports on Monday show more than 9,256 differs in the Moclips area took 160,896 clams, with 10,193 Copalis area diggers taking 193,327 clams.

On Long Beach alone, diggers went home with 428,861 clams. That means that together, over one million of our favorite bi-vales went home with visitors to be fried, canned, dumped into chowder, or made into sushi.

But don’t worry about diminishing the population. Razor clams propagate at an astonishing rate.

Shellfish harvest licenses are required in order to dig clams. These are available at any sporting goods store.

Law requires that clammers keep the first clams they dig (no putting back small clams). In most years, the limit is 15 clams, but through the end of 2021, it was increased to 20 when recent surveys who healthy populations.

Razor clams are very fragile and easily broken: each year thousands of clams are wasted when diggers return small or damaged clams to the sand.

The next time you are sitting on our condo deck at Hi-Tide Resort gazing out over the sand and sea, think of those millions of razor clams enjoying the ocean just as much as you are.

Author: Wm. May – Clam Lover, Hi Tide Resort
Blog #: 0828 – 11/01/21

Comments: 1

Mark Rauschert 11/30/21

I'm in the market for a unit at High Tide.
Please feel free to contact me at any time regarding a unit coming up for sale.
Mark Rauschert
253 820 9090
manthonr@gmail.com

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